7 Things Nobody Tells You About Iran

Facts That You Never Knew AboutAre you planning a trip to Iran? Here’s 7 things you should know before traveling to Iran. 7 Things Nobody Tells You About Iran As an Iranian interacting with many foreigners, I encounter with many interesting questions in my day-to-day life and I also discover some interesting, yet overlooked details about my country and its culture. The questions normally range from more general topics like politics, economics and religion to tiny details about everyday life of people in Iran. Here are some of the most frequent topics I have been asked as an Iranian, so let’s check it out to see if you also carry the same doubts about this less-known land or not! Do you live in the future? When I talk about dates and calendars in general, our Iranian solar calendar is one of weirdest details about Iran. People normally get surprised when  ... “7 Things Nobody Tells You About Iran”

ادامه ←

نوشته شده در: دسته‌بندی نشده

Windcatcher: An Ancient Engineering Feat that Harnessed the Wind

Windcatcher (Badgir)An ancient engineering feat that harnessed the wind Windcatcher in IranBĀDGĪR (wind-tower), literally “wind catcher,” a traditional structure used for passive air-conditioning of buildings. Iran has a rich and varied architectural history going back over 3,000 years, and the remains of Iranian architectural monuments can be found from Syria to India and China. Iranian architecture make uses of a great variety of techniques such as stone carving, stucco and plasterwork, tile and brickwork, mirror and glasswork, and other ornamental elements. As in any architecture, geographical, religious, political, technological, and natural factors determine the quality and quantity of architecture. A windcatchers or Badgir used in traditional architecture in Iran. Many of the diverse architectural designs and structures in Iranian lands resulted from the availability of suitable natural resources and consideration of factors such as climate. The landscape itself is a source of both constraint and freedom. The Iranian kavir (desert)  ... “Windcatcher: An Ancient Engineering Feat that Harnessed the Wind”

ادامه ←

نوشته شده در: دسته‌بندی نشده

Zoroastrianism (Mazdayasna) in Iran

Zoroastrianism in IranZoroastrianism in Iran: A journey to the depths of religion in ancient Iran Zoroastrianism (Mazdayasna) in IranZoroastrianism or Mazdayasna is one of the world’s oldest monotheistic religions, having originated in ancient Persia. Zoroastrianism or Mazdayasna is one of the world’s oldest continuously practiced religions and is officially recognized and protected, and have reserved a seat in the Iran parliament. Zoroastrians make up one of the smallest religious minorities in contemporary Iran, numbering only about 32,000 (as of 1986). Sadeh, is an Iranian festival that dates back to the first Persian Empire, Achaemenid Empire. Sadeh celebrates 50 days before Nowruz. Sadeh in Persian means “hundred” and refers to one hundred days and nights remains to the beginning of spring. It is a multi-faceted faith centered on a dualistic cosmology of good and evil and an eschatology predicting the ultimate conquest of evil with theological elements of henotheism, monotheism/monism, and  ... “Zoroastrianism (Mazdayasna) in Iran”

ادامه ←

نوشته شده در: دسته‌بندی نشده

Christians and Jews in Iran

Christians and Jews in IranChristianity, Judaism as the official religions in Iran Christians and Jews in IranThe constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran recognizes Islam, Christianity, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism as official religions. Judaism and Christianity in Iran are represented by small but significant religious communities that can also be regarded, to some extent, as distinct ethnic groups. Jews have lived in Iran since ancient times, and Iran has a special place in Jewish history and the development of Judaism: Cyrus the Great, who liberated the Jews from the Babylonian captivity and authorized the rebuilding of the Temple, was called by Isaiah the “anointed of the lord”; Queen Esther and Mordechai supposedly lived at the court of an Iranian king (their tombs are still believed to be in Hamadân, home to one of the country’s largest Jewish communities). Esther and Mordecai is a 1685 oil on panel painting by Arent  ... “Christians and Jews in Iran”

ادامه ←

نوشته شده در: دسته‌بندی نشده